Huron Land Records

Ontario Historical Land Records are available online at https://www.onland.ca/ui/

  1. Type in County name.
  2. Scroll down, choose “Historical Books – Search.”
  3. Choose “Browse Books.”
  4. Choose “Browse Abstract/Parcel Register Book.”
  5. Top left will indicate number of results – e.g. 1 to 30 of 337 result(s)
  6. Scroll to bottom of frame. You can click on right arrow to advance to the next frame OR change
    the current frame number, then press “Enter” to move to a specific frame. Use the “Filter”
    to quickly access listings for a specific township.
  7. When you find the appropriate result, click “View Details.”
  8. Again, scroll to the bottom, check the total number of frames, advance using “Next” or change the frame number and “Enter.”
  9. To manipulate the image: mouse scroll wheel or vertical scroll bar to go up or down; click and drag or use horizontal scroll bar to move sideways; plus or minus icons to zoom; rotate icon; full screen Huron County Branch OGS – August 2019 41 c/o Huron County Museum, 110 North Street, Goderich, Ontario N7A 2T8 icon (click again to leave full screen)
  10. Some counties/regions have more choices than just the Abstract/Parcel Register Book – explore the other options: General Register Index (non-land-specific documents, e.g. probates index); By-Law Index; Condominium Corporation Index; Canada Lands Index; First Registration Book (list of first registrations from registry to land titles, e.g. Crown Patent or Crown plan); Retake Book; Power of Attorney Index; Subdivision Plan Index; Reference Plan Index.
  11. Choose “Property” screen to find plan and lot number by using the street address (must already have chosen a county). This option does not always work well; must fill in street number, street name, and person requesting the information (“me” or your name). Try using the street name without the word “Street.” It would seem that, to be included in the “hits,” the address must have been registered before the system was computerized in the 1990s and/or before new 911 addressing.
  12. Any Retakes must be accessed from the Browse Abstract/Parcel Book results list or from separate Retake Books, not from among the pages for the specific lot.
  13. Clicking on “Return to Search Results” takes you back to the Homepage or to Search Books page; instead, use the back arrow at top left corner of screen to backtrack.
  14. Use “Change” beside county name in green bar at top of page to switch to a different county.
  15. You do not have to register or login to use the website.
  16. Service/searching is not available outside of the search hours listed on the homepage:
    Monday through Thursday – 4 a.m. to 12 a.m.
    Friday – 4 a.m. to 9 p.m.
    Saturday – 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    Sunday – 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Kingston Relations, March/April 2019
In an item in the Jan-Feb issue, I lamented that I couldn’t even find my own address in the property
listings at Onland.ca. Fortunately, branch member Bruce Elliott explained what I was doing wrong: I was interested to see your article about the recent changes to the onland.ca site. To search in urban areas you need to know the plan and lot numbers, but you can often now get this from OnLand by clicking on PROPERTY and then on ADDRESS and inserting your house number and street name, in your case XXX and YYYYYYY. You suggest this didn’t work when you tried it, but you need to fill in the box for “Requested by”. I just put the word “me” there. When I tried it, this brought up the legal description as Lot 35, PL 505 Kingston. Going to the Abstract Books (or ‘Historical Books’) and searching for Plan 505, it brought up the abstracts beginning with registration of plan 505 for Strathcona Park No. 3 subdivision in 1952, and the transactions down to and including your purchase of lot 35. The entries only run to the early 1990s when everything shifted out of the ‘Historical Books’ of the Registry system to the Land Titles system. This searching is free of charge; only if you want to see the instruments do you have to pay, and I imagine you can still go to the LRO in Kingston and see them on microfilm gratis as you can in Ottawa.
Thanks for that explanation, Bruce. It should make it easy for those of us wondering about ancestral
homes, or our own, in towns or cities. Nancy Cutway, Editor [item used with permission]
Showing 1 to 1 of 1 search results for Address “209 SHUTER STREET”
209 SHUTER STREET WINGHAM LT 9 PL 418 WINGHAM; WINGHAM; TOWNSHIP OF NORTH HURON
The neighbouring addresses had been entered into the program as:
203 SHUTER ST WINGHAM LT 8 PL 418 WINGHAM; WINGHAM; TOWNSHIP OF NORTH HURON
195 SHUTER ST WINGHAM LT 7 PL 418 WINGHAM; WINGHAM; TOWNSHIP OF NORTH HURON
217 SHUTER ST WINGHAM LT 10 PL 418 WINGHAM; WINGHAM; TOWNSHIP OF NORTH HURON